In Northern Ontario if you drive to the end of a snow packed route 648, past the government serviced highways, it ends at Aroland First Nation. Past there, the only way to get around are old logging roads and trapping trails that have been there for generations. The native people of Aroland have seen industry and jobs come and go. With the logging industry having long moved on, unemployment in the tiny community is upwards of 90 percent. People survive off a mix of subsistence hunting, trapping and government assistance. With a new pit mine proposed north of Aroland, locals are worried about how their pristine wilderness will be degraded as nearly 100 trucks a day could pass through, carting ore to the train tracks near by.   Shot on assignment for Bloomberg Markets Magazine
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 In Northern Ontario if you drive to the end of a snow packed route 648, past the government serviced highways, it ends at Aroland First Nation. Past there, the only way to get around are old logging roads and trapping trails that have been there for generations. The native people of Aroland have seen industry and jobs come and go. With the logging industry having long moved on, unemployment in the tiny community is upwards of 90 percent. People survive off a mix of subsistence hunting, trapping and government assistance. With a new pit mine proposed north of Aroland, locals are worried about how their pristine wilderness will be degraded as nearly 100 trucks a day could pass through, carting ore to the train tracks near by.   Shot on assignment for Bloomberg Markets Magazine
In Northern Ontario if you drive to the end of a snow packed route 648, past the government serviced highways, it ends at Aroland First Nation. Past there, the only way to get around are old logging roads and trapping trails that have been there for generations. The native people of Aroland have seen industry and jobs come and go. With the logging industry having long moved on, unemployment in the tiny community is upwards of 90 percent. People survive off a mix of subsistence hunting, trapping and government assistance. With a new pit mine proposed north of Aroland, locals are worried about how their pristine wilderness will be degraded as nearly 100 trucks a day could pass through, carting ore to the train tracks near by. Shot on assignment for Bloomberg Markets Magazine
friberg_aroland_lowres-12.jpg
more_aroland-14.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-14.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-89.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-38.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-39.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-54.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-31.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-18.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-20.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-21.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-45.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-23.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-70.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-66.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-43.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-2.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-44.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-51.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-58.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-61.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-63.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-88.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-64.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-67.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-29.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-69.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-83.jpg
friberg_aroland_lowres-87.jpg
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